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is eternal recurrence possible

But, most importantly for our purposes, what did eternal recurrence mean to Nietzsche? Except you don’t laugh, and you take our time. —All anew, all eternal, all enlinked, enlaced and enamoured, Oh, then did ye LOVE the world,—. Good post ! In a very tangible way, eternal recurrence lays the foundation for Zarathustra, and leads directly into this magnum opus of Nietzsche’s. It was then that the thought struck me. Looking back now, I find that exactly two months before this inspiration I had an omen of its coming in the form of a sudden and decisive change in my tastes—more particularly in music. My hand pulled at the serpent, and pulled:—in vain! When Zarathustra, confirming eternal recurrence, says even the small man returns.

Then had the serpent crawled into his throat—there had it bitten itself fast.

What could ten new years teach that the past could not teach?” (UMII.1) Therefore, whatever the Pythagoreans, or for that matter Heine or Kierkegaard wrote on the subject is informative as to how Nietzsche may have gotten the idea, but not relevant to why it became so important to him.

The idea that the biblical version of creation might not be "how it was done.". And this one, as well: “After the vision of the overman, in a gruesome way the doctrine of recurrence: now bearable!” (Ibid, XVI 110). 1, trans. From a writing-critique perspective, it was to me, very unjustified within the context of all of the previous storyline, extremely out-of-character for Cohle and a very ‘barnacled-on’ attempt to salvage some religious-perspective for Cohle. In the passage, Nietzsche seems to seriously entertain the possibility that the doctrine is literally true. Excuse me for answering to you, but since I’ve been motivated to read it to the end (and I did), I just want to say that I think you get it right when saying that there is "no progress". If the latter, I find this more plausible, and more philosophically valuable. The final passage we will consider is from ‘The Drunken Song’ in Zarathustra (excerpts from 10, 11): Said ye ever Yea to one joy? And I couldn’t have possibly known it would be wasted. However, the example presupposes the possibility of perfect continuity: for instance, if the universe proves to have a quantum foam nature, then the exact quantity of an irrational number cannot be expressed by any physical object. WHO is the man into whose throat all the heaviest and blackest will thus crawl? —So rich is joy that it thirsteth for woe, for hell, for hate, for shame, for the lame, for the WORLD,—for this world, Oh, ye know it indeed! In Ecce Homo (1888), he wrote that he thought of the eternal return as the "fundamental conception" of Thus Spoke Zarathustra.[9]. It's a psychological concept to see how really 'life affirming' you are. If the second wheel rotated twice as fast as the first, and if the speed of the third wheel was 1/π of the speed of the first, the initial line-up would never recur.

Whether this can have any bearing on Cohle’s apparent change of heart is not at all evident, because he originally portrayed the repetition of life in a Schopenhauerian spirit. Vogt, Die Kraft. The wish for the eternal return of all events would mark the ultimate affirmation of life: http://www.mlaforum.org/volumeV/issue1/article3.html, https://pagan.wikia.org/wiki/Eternal_return?oldid=5325. But what follows is an unusual scene where Zarathustra seems to describe eternal recurrence – or rather, the eternality of “the moment”, and the eternity that lays behind and ahead of every moment – and the dwarf, surprisingly, admits rather flippantly that he does know of this ‘abysmal thought’: “Halt, dwarf!” said I. Every atom, during an infinite interval, would assume the same arrangement again and again. (See also "Atum" and "Ma'at."). However, Zarathustra rebuffs the dwarf in the following paragraph, warning him against the spirit of gravity. On Nietzsche’s terms, saying Yes to life would entail the eternal repetition of his daughter’s death. In spite of this continued cheerfulness, Nietzsche expressed to Overbeck that part three of Zarathustra would delve fully into the tragic or pessimistic aspects of existence, and it is in part three (written in 1883) that Zarathustra elaborates more fully on eternal recurrence. Oddly enough, eternal recurrence doesn't figure too prominently into any of the works Nietzsche published after Thus Spoke Zarathustra.

All importance flows out of and flows back into this life and this world exactly as they are – are we now sufficiently far into the future… that some among us might have the strength for that? Must not whatever CAN happen of all things have already happened, resulted, and gone by? “Eternally he returneth, the man of whom thou art weary, the small man”—so yawned my sadness, and dragged its foot and could not go to sleep. It should be noted that these were the years he spent primarily in Genoa and in Sils Maria, dealing with intense migraine headaches and the consequent illness, the ailments which had forced him to retire a handful of years beforehand. answered Zarathustra, and smiled once more, how well do ye know what had to be fulfilled in seven days:—. One thing that I don’t think is clear is whether Schopenhauer believes that we will actually live life eternally, or whether this is a more general destiny for the human race as a whole.

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Mutely marching over the scornful clinking of pebbles, trampling the stone that let it slip: thus did my foot force its way upwards. Eternal return (also known as "eternal recurrence") is a concept which posits that time is circular, and that all history very literally repeats itself. “Either I—or thou! However, there is a section dedicated to the idea in The Will to Power, a collection of notes published by Nietzsche’s sister Elizabeth in 1901. Nobody yet has had this strength!” In another note in Twilight of Idols, Nietzsche writes “The self-overcoming of Zarathustra as the prototype of mankind's self-overcoming for the benefit of Superman.” (notes on TSZ, 20) – confirming that Zarathustra, while still just a ‘prototype’ is paving the way for the Overman: and his greatest challenge to overcome is his most ‘abysmal thought’. Zarathustra relates how he then happened upon a spepherd in his vision, whose neck was encoiled by a snake, whose fangs were fastened on him: Had I ever seen so much loathing and pale horror on one countenance? He was, however, distrustful of art for this purpose, because of art’s tendency to amplify irrational feelings and throw a dishonest ‘gauze’ over reality. The long and rich summer [in Tautenburg] was for me a time of rehearsals; it is with the greatest confidence and pride that I now take my departure from it. Such ideas of cyclical time later fell out of fashion, especially in the West, with the rise of Christianity. Ye higher men, do learn it, that joys want eternity. In other words, the dinosaurs have lived an infinite number of times in the past, and they will live an infinite number of times in the future. Nietzsche calls the idea "horrifying and paralyzing," and says that its burden is the "heaviest weight" ("das schwerste Gewicht") imaginable. The eternal hourglass of existence is turned upside down again and again, and you with it, speck of dust!”.

But, most importantly for our purposes, what did eternal recurrence mean to Nietzsche? Except you don’t laugh, and you take our time. —All anew, all eternal, all enlinked, enlaced and enamoured, Oh, then did ye LOVE the world,—. Good post ! In a very tangible way, eternal recurrence lays the foundation for Zarathustra, and leads directly into this magnum opus of Nietzsche’s. It was then that the thought struck me. Looking back now, I find that exactly two months before this inspiration I had an omen of its coming in the form of a sudden and decisive change in my tastes—more particularly in music. My hand pulled at the serpent, and pulled:—in vain! When Zarathustra, confirming eternal recurrence, says even the small man returns.

Then had the serpent crawled into his throat—there had it bitten itself fast.

What could ten new years teach that the past could not teach?” (UMII.1) Therefore, whatever the Pythagoreans, or for that matter Heine or Kierkegaard wrote on the subject is informative as to how Nietzsche may have gotten the idea, but not relevant to why it became so important to him.

The idea that the biblical version of creation might not be "how it was done.". And this one, as well: “After the vision of the overman, in a gruesome way the doctrine of recurrence: now bearable!” (Ibid, XVI 110). 1, trans. From a writing-critique perspective, it was to me, very unjustified within the context of all of the previous storyline, extremely out-of-character for Cohle and a very ‘barnacled-on’ attempt to salvage some religious-perspective for Cohle. In the passage, Nietzsche seems to seriously entertain the possibility that the doctrine is literally true. Excuse me for answering to you, but since I’ve been motivated to read it to the end (and I did), I just want to say that I think you get it right when saying that there is "no progress". If the latter, I find this more plausible, and more philosophically valuable. The final passage we will consider is from ‘The Drunken Song’ in Zarathustra (excerpts from 10, 11): Said ye ever Yea to one joy? And I couldn’t have possibly known it would be wasted. However, the example presupposes the possibility of perfect continuity: for instance, if the universe proves to have a quantum foam nature, then the exact quantity of an irrational number cannot be expressed by any physical object. WHO is the man into whose throat all the heaviest and blackest will thus crawl? —So rich is joy that it thirsteth for woe, for hell, for hate, for shame, for the lame, for the WORLD,—for this world, Oh, ye know it indeed! In Ecce Homo (1888), he wrote that he thought of the eternal return as the "fundamental conception" of Thus Spoke Zarathustra.[9]. It's a psychological concept to see how really 'life affirming' you are. If the second wheel rotated twice as fast as the first, and if the speed of the third wheel was 1/π of the speed of the first, the initial line-up would never recur.

Whether this can have any bearing on Cohle’s apparent change of heart is not at all evident, because he originally portrayed the repetition of life in a Schopenhauerian spirit. Vogt, Die Kraft. The wish for the eternal return of all events would mark the ultimate affirmation of life: http://www.mlaforum.org/volumeV/issue1/article3.html, https://pagan.wikia.org/wiki/Eternal_return?oldid=5325. But what follows is an unusual scene where Zarathustra seems to describe eternal recurrence – or rather, the eternality of “the moment”, and the eternity that lays behind and ahead of every moment – and the dwarf, surprisingly, admits rather flippantly that he does know of this ‘abysmal thought’: “Halt, dwarf!” said I. Every atom, during an infinite interval, would assume the same arrangement again and again. (See also "Atum" and "Ma'at."). However, Zarathustra rebuffs the dwarf in the following paragraph, warning him against the spirit of gravity. On Nietzsche’s terms, saying Yes to life would entail the eternal repetition of his daughter’s death. In spite of this continued cheerfulness, Nietzsche expressed to Overbeck that part three of Zarathustra would delve fully into the tragic or pessimistic aspects of existence, and it is in part three (written in 1883) that Zarathustra elaborates more fully on eternal recurrence. Oddly enough, eternal recurrence doesn't figure too prominently into any of the works Nietzsche published after Thus Spoke Zarathustra.

All importance flows out of and flows back into this life and this world exactly as they are – are we now sufficiently far into the future… that some among us might have the strength for that? Must not whatever CAN happen of all things have already happened, resulted, and gone by? “Eternally he returneth, the man of whom thou art weary, the small man”—so yawned my sadness, and dragged its foot and could not go to sleep. It should be noted that these were the years he spent primarily in Genoa and in Sils Maria, dealing with intense migraine headaches and the consequent illness, the ailments which had forced him to retire a handful of years beforehand. answered Zarathustra, and smiled once more, how well do ye know what had to be fulfilled in seven days:—. One thing that I don’t think is clear is whether Schopenhauer believes that we will actually live life eternally, or whether this is a more general destiny for the human race as a whole.

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